Oh man, you guys. You have no idea how much I have been DYING to share this news with you. The last month has been crazy in terms of sudden new opportunities, budget-wrestling, life-balance agonizing, and everything else that goes with such a major life upheaval.

Here’s the deal: I’ll primarily be writing ongoing posts for The Stir along with some corporate work. I’ll be doing this from home while juggling kid-wrangling, because this is the last week of the boys’ daycare. Three days a week, our wonderful babysitter will be coming from 1-4 in the afternoon to watch Riley and Dylan, and I’ll scoot off to a coffee shop or wherever I can poach some Wi-Fi.

There are a lot of questions I don’t have answers to yet. I will have daily deadlines that I’ll need to meet, and I need to figure out how to do this without relying too much on Yo Gabba Gabba. I know I will slowly go crazy if I don’t have any adult interaction EVER, and the kids need socialization too, so I need a plan for getting us out of the house and interacting with actual live humans. I need a schedule, one that can be flexible enough to accommodate unforeseen problems but structured enough so that I don’t completely morph into this Oatmeal comic.

We decided to wait on starting Riley in kindergarten this year, so I had to think long and hard about whether it was the right thing to do to pull him from preschool. (His daycare is a care center and school combined.) And Dylan, for that matter—they have both done really well in their classes over the years. Under my new salary, I can’t afford to keep sending them there even part time.

Maybe I will find a less expensive preschool somewhere down the road (although as long as we live in this area it seems doubtful), but for now they’ll be home with me. The idea is that school—the homeschool variety—is going to be part of our new routine too. I don’t have much to say about that yet, but I’m hopeful that we can figure out the time management, and that the inevitable frustration is tempered by fun. I hope that it ends up being a great opportunity to connect with my kids and enjoy the last of their little-boyhood.

I have no doubts whatsoever that all of this is going to be really, really hard, in a lot of different ways. But I’ll tell you what, goddamn if the very best things aren’t always hard as hell.

Priorities have shifted all over the place, and I won’t be going back to school in the fall like I’d planned. Winter, probably. I will slowly but surely chase down that dream, no matter how long it takes.

I still dream of a career helping people reach their fitness goals. I want to get our house sold and move to Oregon. I want to write a book. I want to do a lot of things, and my road seems wider and more beckoning than ever before. This isn’t my forever, this is my new right now. And it is so, so much better than my yesterday.

For that and so much more, I want to say thank you. Thank you so very, very much for reading and being part of our lives. Without you I would not have this opportunity, and that is the absolute truth. The words aren’t enough, but I want you to know: I am so incredibly grateful.

Now, my dear friends. The comments are open for all kinds of advice, because I would love to hear any and everything you might want to share about surviving being at home full time, figuring out schedules, avoiding hermit-ness, keeping kids happy, not collapsing in a pile of your own personal filth, and so on. Next week a new chapter of our lives is starting, and I am so happy to be sharing it with you.

birds

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Eric's Mommy
Eric's Mommy
12 years ago

I am so glad that you share your life with us. You are an inspiration!

I lost my job in Oct. 09 and have been home since, other then a crappy contract job I took for 4 months. I make more money on unemployment right now then I would if I found a job. Eventually when that runs out I have to go back to work. My biggest thing is routine, now that Eric is back in school we have more of a routine but the summer was crazy, we didn’t do a lot. Getting out of the house and being around people is important.

maggie
12 years ago

I have no advice to give because I have only been home full time for the year after each of my 2 kids were born and I about lost my mind! I think the greatest thing you have planned is some time for yourself to get away and focus on work or, you know, spend 3 hours on You Tube, whatever. For me, that would be my sanity. Good luck! I think you will find this will be the best thing for you and your family, overall, just maybe not in every moment, but is anything, really?

Marie Green
12 years ago

What has saved my sanity is the group of moms I’ve found to hang out with. It took forever, but I’ve finally found/created/developed a great group. We get together once/week as a formal “playgroup” for the kids (but really, it’s for us), but we see each other often other times- dinner, weekends, spontaneous afternoons, etc. We also swamp kid-watching back and forth and I’m telling you, it’s a LOVELY way to raise kids- with 5 or so friends to call on if I need childcare for 2 hours on Wednesday… So that’s my first survival tip: FIND YOUR PEOPLE. It’s worth the energy, the time, etc.

Also, our winters are brutal, so we get together at the library or in each other’s homes. I used to care how clean my house was; I don’t anymore.

Finally, I cling to my afternoon quiet. Marin still naps, and if my big kids are home I park them squarely in front of the tv. I can get so much done during those 2-3 hours. SO MUCH.

Jan
Jan
12 years ago

First off, CONGRATULATIONS!!! It’s great to see someone chase their dreams.
I am at home with 3 kids age 4 and under. Some days I question my sanity. Like many others have suggested, it is so important to leave the house everyday. In a big city you will have no problems finding lots to do – for FREE (or really cheap).
Organization is key. For everything.
You are going to do great and your boys are going to love being able to spend so much more time with you.

Melissa
12 years ago

Hi Linda,
My name is Melissa. I have recently discovered your blog and am really enjoying it. I am living out a similar situation to the one you are diving into. I am at home with my two daughters. Caring for them takes up almost every ounce of my time and energy but there is a tiny sliver left for my true passion, writing. As my girls get older I would like to give writing more and more attention, as you are doing now.

I started a blog platform two years ago where I write about the juxtaposition of being a birthmother to my eleven year old birthdaughter, and mothering my own two little girls, Twila (four) and Jada (eight-months).

I wish you luck in your next stage of the writing journey, and invite you to visit my blog. I would love to hear your feedback and any advice you might have for a new blogger.

Check out my blog at: http://www.birthmomguide.blogspot.com

Thanks for your time, Linda
Sincerely,
Melissa
Melissa.nilsen@gmail.com

Nancy
Nancy
12 years ago

Congratulations! 25 years ago, way before it was usually an attainable goal, I was given the opportunity to work full time from my home. I can honestly say that a)it’s as frustrating as all hell and b)it was the best thing I ever did.
A few bits of assvice: Don’t let yourself get socially isolated. Make yourself a schedule that, whenever possible, closes that office in your brain at 5pm Friday and doesn’t reopen it til 9am Monday, or whatever hours work best for you. (You may not notice yourself sliding into the “work whenever you need to” thing until you find yourself getting out of bed at 3:30 or 4 am to get “just one more thing” finished up.)
Also, enjoy this. You have been given the opportunity to have the best of both worlds. I am grateful to have had the chance, I know you will be too! Best of luck.

Auntie G
Auntie G
12 years ago

Long time reader, pert’ near never poster. Ah, well.

Congratulations on all you and your family have going on! Wanted to chime in on the “free stuff” idea — I’m in Chicago, and one of the best things I do in January is google the heck out of “free admission kids chicago” etc. and then write EVERY SINGLE thing in my daily planner. It sounds ridiculous and it’s a pain BUT I cannot tell you how many times it’s saved my husband’s, caregivers’, and my sanity to be able to open up the book and say: today there is a free story time at the coffeeshop, and the Field Museum is free. I don’t know what your Seattle ‘burb is like, but I was bowled over at how many museums have free days, and those that even have free sections all the time for kids. Oh — also we have Time Out Chicago online which lists free stuff daily, and I’m sure there’s a Seattle counterpart.

Finally, another blog that is delightful, HILARIOUS, and involves two brothers who are homeschooled is “electric boogaloo.”

Best wishes and thanks for all the great stories — looking forward to even more!

kath
12 years ago

okay, me again, first: standard no-child disclaimer –
but this might be a tip that works – I must have read it or seen it somewhere because I sure didn’t think it up –
Mom had a sign, some sort of picture that she hung on the door to her work space – when she needed to work or was on the phone she would hang up the sign, point it out to the kids, give them an activity to do for the fifteen minutes that she needed and the kids knew that they couldn’t disrupt her when that sign was up. They earned treats or praise or stars or something when they did a good job of “listening” to the sign. Might work for those times when you need them to occupy themselves while you’re doing business.

Jen - Mom of 4
Jen - Mom of 4
12 years ago

I am sooo happy for you! This is a big step that will make you and your family really happy!

For preschool, you may want to look at area churches who may have a preschool that offers 3 day a week classes. We did that will all of my kids and the cost was not too bad. I realize you guys don’t attend church, but you don’t have to attend the church to sign up for the classes.

Have fun and enjoy the moment!!
Jen

Kader
Kader
12 years ago

I think a million people have already said this, but get out of the house every day! Jonna is totally right about being sure to get dressed every day, too. I’m sure you can find different kid activities (library story time, open gyms) that will accommodate both Riley and Dylan. You might want to create a schedule with something to do each morning, even if it’s only going to the grocery store. (Wait, are they bearable in the grocery store? I only have one, and he’s only one, so he does whatever.)
I also want to say that I am so thrilled for you to have taken this step. You’ve done so many major things in the past year. You inspire me on a regular basis.
Keep writing when things get really hard. It’ll do your heart good to get it out and get the support and empathy that you need.
HOORAY!!

ami
ami
12 years ago

My relatives in Kirkland have utilized their neighborhood co op preschools. They have loved it, and since parents are required to volunteer a few hours a week, it gives them social interaction as well!

Jill
Jill
12 years ago

Looking forward to reading through your comments too. I have a daughter, slightly younger than Dylan. We go to several programs at the library (for Riley there might be quite a few) – and those are free. Free is good.
Community education programs are usually less expensive than going to a place that offers that program specifically (dance classes, gymnastics, karate, art, etc.)
I try to limit TV not by time, but by certain programs that I know she likes to watch, otherwise I turn the TV off and she has to find something else to do.
There’s a ton of websites on homeschooling. I’ve been finding some useful info on this site: http://www.1plus1plus1equals1.com/ just for some things to do that are educational (we don’t formally homeschool.)

Good Luck!

kari
kari
12 years ago

In Florida we have VPK, which is free and I only found out about it on accident. No one at my daughter’s preschool told me that it was offered. Perhaps it’s available where you are, also? Never could have afforded it last year (when I was out of work) otherwise, so it was a blessing.

As for your work from home opportunity: Lucky!
So jealous and happy for you.

nikki
nikki
12 years ago

I am regular reader but have never commented and I just want to say how awesome this is! You are certainly inspiring to those of us that work at jobs we do not love and miss our kids all day just for a paycheck. Congratulations on following your dreams. May we all have the balls to do so at some point in our lives…..

bacioni
bacioni
12 years ago

If there’s anyone out there that can do this, it’s you. Look how much change you’ve gone through over the years, add this notch to your belt. Rock on!

Molly
Molly
12 years ago

Woohoo! Congratulations and best of luck with your new direction. I’m sure you’ll do great. No first-hand advice, as I can’t fathom working with kids at home, but, if you haven’t seen it already, Kristen over at Motherhood Uncensored had some good interviews with WAH moms recently, some of whom deal with working while kids are at home. Maybe there’s something helpful there.

Abbie Dahl
12 years ago

No advice from me either, but you are one hell of an inspiration! Congratulations for taking the first step in choosing the life you want!

Kris
Kris
12 years ago

Congratulations!
My only advice is something I wish I did more during my maternity leave (1 year off here in good old Canada) is to take a shower and get dressed first thing in the morning. I know working at home isn’t the same but the idea of it being 3 and you’re still in your pyjamas is still just as possible.
Pyjamas are fun but don’t make for a very productive day!

Kiwi
12 years ago

I’m a freelance designer/illustrator who also helps run a company on the side. I work from home in NYC.

Basically, I make schedules, actually try to wake up for alarms, make sure I wear work-related clothes (cause PJs and robes always make me feel lazy) and made a proper office for myself away from the TV/hang out rooms.

On top of that, I have a combo whiteboard/corkboard above my desk. The whiteboard serves to cover my ever-changing To Do list: upcoming deadlines, things that need to be accomplished that day, etc. When I finish a task I wipe it off and always start my day writing out the list of things to do while I check my emails.

The corkboard is for the repeating things I need to do, whether it’s update a blog by a certain time every day, my weekly comic deadlines, the list of supplies I must bring out to every business meeting, etc.

It helps with my focus and memory, cause gods know I lack both of those. And I if I can’t keep that in line, I’ll never be able to hack it as a freelancer.

Otherwise, if you’re not reading blogs about freelancing (I adore freelanceswitch.com since it covers most kinds of freelancers), stick some in your RSS aggregator or just skim through their archives during some off time. Blogs like that keep me motivated, help me with issues and the communities help remind me why I’m doing this when things get tough.

Liz
Liz
12 years ago

Well, hell, I’ll pay you to make me muscular and skinny, as long as you don’t charge me the ridiculous prices I’m seeing. I even already have a gym membership!

Other than that, the King Co libraries have great story hours all the time. I’m sure you’re aware of the play area at Bellevue Square, and I think there’s free wi-fi there.

SJ
SJ
12 years ago

Chase your dreams and you will soar! I have no doubt that this will turn out wonderfully for you. Best of luck and again big congratulations!

Sunny
Sunny
12 years ago

You’ve done the hard part. You’ve made the jump. The future won’t be all cotton candy and kittens for any of us, but by God you’re going to kick ass and inspire a hell of a lot of us to chase our own dreams.

Paula
Paula
12 years ago

Congrats! I have been a SAHM for 4 1/2 years now. Advice: a) keep a schedule (weather on paper or electronic) broken down into 1/2 hour increments. It will constantly change, but it will help you keep on track. b) it took a while to find your groove when you first started at your last job – this is a job too, so don’t expect balance right away.

Joe
Joe
12 years ago

My one piece of advice is to join the Pacific Northwest Writers Association. Meetings are once a month in Bellevue (you can attend up to 2 a year free I think. Next one is being led by my Freelance Editor / Book Doctor Jason Black on Sept 22. All kinds of writers there (fiction, nonfiction, newspaper reporters, free lancers), including some pretty famous authors like Bob Dugoni and PNWA Prez Pam Binder.

It’s an awesome support system for writers getting started, and really helped me to turn the corner from my writing being a hobby to a career. The conference they hold (next year it’s in Bellevue), is one of the the largest in the US, and brings agents and editors into town who are looking for new authors to sign. They also have a huge writing contest with all kinds of subjects that really helps to get your material out there (not that you have a problem with that)

You may even find some other writers in your are who are looking for someone to be in a writers group. That’s how I got mine started.

Jessi
12 years ago

I’m so excited for you! My husband works freelance and wrangles our 14-month-old. His rule is to treat each day like you would if you were working out of the house. Get up on time, shower, eat, work during x hours and GET OUT OF THE HOUSE at least once.

There are times when the kid rules the whole day, but he’s able to make it work.

Bethany
12 years ago

(homeschooling/part-time-working mom of two-now 4th and 5th grades-who is still, even after doing this for 6 years, not quite sure how the fall routine will settle)

I see so many people suggesting getting out of the house every day and I have many friends for whom this pattern is a necessity. However, if I don’t have at least a day or two a week when I don’t have to go anywhere, I don’t get any housework done (and it’s bad enough as it is). So mostly, I echo those who have said that, though it might take some trial-and-error, you’ll find your own patterns (well, ok, then you’ll find them again as stuff seems to shift almost constantly with young kids). I hope you settle into your new schedule easily with plenty of space for peace.

sooboo
sooboo
12 years ago

I have worked at home for 5 years now (no kids though) and a couple of things that have kept me sane are: exercising, showering and getting dressed first thing in the AM and having a designated work room/studio so my projects don’t bleed into my life too much. I know that I should set a time to be done at the end of the day, but I don’t. I guess find the routine that works for you and stick to it. I will say too that although it’s often tempting to shut myself in for days and work, it makes me a little weird in a not good way, so getting out every day or at least talking to someone every day is probably a good idea. I’ve been reading your blog since before you had kids and I am so excited for you. By doing this you are also teaching them to follow their dreams. So cool.

Ashley Rose
Ashley Rose
12 years ago

Make sure you have set times for certain things and stick to them. Ie. wake up by this time, get dressed before 9am, go out for 1 hour in morning, etc. It helps keep you accountable for yourself.

Ashley Rose
Ashley Rose
12 years ago

Oh and Good luck! This is such an exciting development!

Kelly
Kelly
12 years ago

I have been a teacher for five years and this year I had a baby and decided to stay home. I joined my local MOMS club (www.momsclub.org) and its great because they have activities/playdates every weekday…I get to interact with other adults and kids get to meet and play with each other.

Victoria
12 years ago

I don’t have any advice but do want to say that I’m proud of you and excited for you and love feeling like I’m cheering you on. It inspires me!

Sonia
Sonia
12 years ago

GOOD FOR YOU!!!!
Staying home with the kid(s) is difficult. Some times more than others, and it mostly balances out. I want to echo everyone else’s suggestion to get up and shower, get dressed and made up every day. It’s way too easy to live in a pair of sweats, and it just makes you feel like crap.
Accept now that there will be rough days, and just forgive yourself and have a do-over the next day. Everyone has *off* days, and sometimes it will be your off day…..and sometimes it will be one or both of the boys.
I think it’s really smart to have hired your sitter to come in for a few hours certain days, so that you can work. I did that with my nieces a few times this summer, and it was really helpful. I could lock myself in the office, and focus on my online job, but I was still around if they had any questions.
Again, GOOD FOR YOU!!!! You’re inspiring as hell to so many people Linda.

Mary
Mary
12 years ago

Oh, good for you. I didn’t read all the other comments in detail, so sorry if I repeat, but here are my 2 cents. (I’ve been self employed for about 3 years now.)

–There was a transition period, sometimes euphoric, sometimes crappy. It gets better. I know you expect this, but there were moments for me when I thought this is IT and it will be THIS HARD FOREVER. Not true.
–When I work from home, I totally stay in my yoga pants till noon and it’s awesome.
–There are groups of other freelancers that do lunches and/or organize working together in coffee shops, and that’s awesome. I missed having work peeps, a place to go, that community. And there are options of how to get it in whatever increment you want in other ways. If nothing else, call up your friends who work from home (I have tons of professor friends–we do this often) and meet up for lunch or a couple hours at a coffee shop to write.
–I don’t know if you’ve set up your business, but I consulted a tax guy who helped me pick the type of company (i’m incorporated) for the best financial benefit. Varies by state–can save you tons.
–Oh, and write off EVERYTHING YOU CAN. (see: consult tax guy, above)
–No matter what I make freelancing a month, I pay myself the same and have a reserve in the business acct for slow months.
–Yes, yes, professional organizations keep you in the loop re: industry developments, etc. and make nice friends.
–If it’s hard w/ the boys at home much of the day, consider a kid swap with another parent. You watch all kids 4 hours Tuesdays, s/he watches yours 4 hours Wednesday, whatever. Free = yay.
–I’m sure you’ll be just fine at this, but a concern I have w/ my daughter is being too… “Just let mommy finish this one email, sweetie.” It’s hard to do both at once without the kid feeling like work comes before them, so I’m very conscious to do one at a time. It’s a juggling act, but I’m sure you’ll find your groove in no time.

Good luck, and congrats. For me? Best thing I ever did.

Christina
12 years ago

I did nearly the same thing as you about three years ago — after having a foster (to adopt) placement of an infant baby boy. I continued to work for six months and it continued to suck my soul, so one day I went in and said Goodbye to all of it. The adult interaction, the regular pay, the career growth. Turns out that casting that aside to raise my son (and then shortly after, a daughter) was the best thing I have done. Ever in the history of ever. I wouldn’t have my daughter if I’d stayed. We managed to move forward (moved to our desired location, bought a house) and it has been hard. The schedule we have works for us — and it changes frequently. I think it would be insulting to you to give advice on how it’ll work because you and your family will find your own way that works for you. I just wish you the very best and hope that your experience casting off the old and broken and diving into this new chapter makes you as happy as it made me.

Amy
Amy
12 years ago

Congratulations! I became a SAHM this past April to my son who just turned 3. I agree with the above comments about getting out of the house, getting dressed, local free kid activities, etc etc.
Another point I wanted to make is that both my son and I had some adjustment periods. The first 3-4 weeks were much harder than I had anticipated. He had been in full-time daycare from 3 months – 2.75 years old. And I had assumed pulling him out to keep at home with his Mommy would just be heaven for him, but I suppose the upheaval of his daily routine was enough to throw him into a funk for 2-3 weeks. He also began seeing his Daddy less, so that was rough on him as well.
After he got through his adjustment phase, I started my own… questioning if I was “contributing” enough to my family (i.e. no paycheck) and providing enough to my son.
My husband was super-helpful as well, reassuring me of my “worth” to our family. That’s my other advice… talk these things through with your husband ahead of time to set expectations (housework, meals, shopping, paying bills, etc).
Being a SAHM is so much more exhausting than sitting in an office 8 hours/day was… so don’t kill yourself over conquering the world… allow yourself a nap/rest occasionally!

wealhtheow
12 years ago

Find a moms group–MOMS club is great and it is an international group, so I’m sure there are some close to you. That way the kids are still getting kid sociliazation, you are still getting adult socialization, and when the shit hits the fan, there are moms you know and trust that you can drop your kids off with for a morning while you go to the doctor or get some work done or whatever.

We’re starting homeschool preschool with this program: http://letteroftheweek.com/preschool_age_3.html She’s a Christian-based homeschooler, but this curriculum doesn’t talk about religion–I think some of her other ones do but you can always just leave that out (we’re Jewish, so we’ll be substituting some info on pertinent Jewish holidays as they come through the year).

Good luck–staying at home is the greatest adventure I’ve ever been on!

Jon
Jon
12 years ago

Make a tour of local homeschool groups and co-ops. There’s a ton of diversity in the homeschool community. I’m sure you can find some neat people there. You’ll also meet some real freaks that might inspire your writing. You can even supplement your income teaching different subjects at co-ops.

lindsay
lindsay
12 years ago

I appreciate all you write. Good luck. Also I’m running my first ever marathon in a couple weeks…inspired and encouraged and motivated by your sites. Thank you!

lindsay
lindsay
12 years ago

oy ya forgot to say that oatmeal comic is hilarious. Laughed out loud at Tuesday’s action items and that is totally the kind of joke I normally I get all uptight about…

Kami
Kami
12 years ago

I’m not sending my just turned 5 year old this year either. You won’t regret this, it’s my third time having to make this decision…darn summer birthdays! You are rocking this change :)

Kim
Kim
12 years ago

Here’s my advice: You. Go. Girl. If anyone can do it, you can do it. And once you figure it out, please do share. :)

Congrats and Good Luck!

Thursday
12 years ago

Get dressed and brush your teeth in the morning. From experience of working at home alone, I found it made all the difference.

bari
12 years ago

What an amazing and life changing decision! My husband and I both work freelance (sometimes home, sometimes not) and we have a 1 year old who has never had a full time nanny or day care. It can be very stressful finding help when things get busy for both of us at the same time but I have no plans to change it anytime soon, I LOVE being able to hang with him an extra 2 hrs vs commuting. If we have deadline work we always hire a sitter. Don’t be surprised if you can’t get as much done with them around as you think. When I’m busy and my husband is not home what works for me is work until 1, then we do afternoon activities so I can concentrate on him, and work again after dinner if needed. You’ll find your groove…it just might be different than you originally planned.

L.E.
L.E.
12 years ago

I am so happy for you. What an exciting and scary thing to do…but sometimes you just have to jump off the cliff. Done that a couple of times, and I have no regrets. Definitely read electric boogaloo. Funny, nice woman with on-line business, homeschooling two young boys.

Maggie
12 years ago

No advice, but just wanted to say you are SO INSPIRING. Congratulations lady!

katie
katie
12 years ago

i didnt read the other comments bc there were so many of them. but bc riley is going into kindergarden next yr, i thought preschool might be kind of important. i know of preschools that operate 3 or 5 days a week for 2 – 3 hrs that are affordable around here in delaware. is there anything like that near you? if not, be good about doing home school exercises, etc with him!

Super Sarah
12 years ago

I cannot wait to read about this new phase in your lives, super exciting!

Jenny
Jenny
12 years ago

Congratulations! I am excited to read about your new adventure :)

As far as advice….I don’t have kids, but I had a stay at home mom. I know you’ll be working and I don’t know what you had growing up, but as an adult I appreciate a lot of what I got out of having my mom at home (obviously, I would have gotten different, but still good things if my mom had worked).

As a kid I wanted nothing more than a mom that worked. I saw my friends at home watching TV all day in the summer or I heard about all of the fun at daycare. But now that I am an adult there are some advantages that I see with the way I grew up and what I would try and do if I was able/wanted to stay home with my kids.

We were never bored. My mom always had some chores that we needed to do. Folding clothes, helping with dishes, dusting, cleaning bathrooms,setting the table, pet chores, picking up sticks outside, etc. And if we ever said we were bored, she would put us right to work. When we were young, we probably were more trouble than we were worth on ‘helping’, but it was good for us. And I am never bored now as an adult. Your kids are young, but don’t be afraid to get them involved in a lot of that stuff.

As far as home school stuff, I know that when my little sisters were being taught to read by sight (instead of phonics), my mom spent a lot of time with Hooked on Phonics (and I know that it is real rich that I am probably spelling that wrong….). It helped them to learn how to read the way that she wanted them to.

mixette
mixette
12 years ago

Here’s my snippet to offer: the blog of a person who is a successful writer and a stay-home, homeschooling mom of 4, where you might find some inspiration and some good advice. Like you, she’s got a good group of smart/dedicated readers too:

http://www.soulemama.com

She’s my first stop every morning even though I am the *complete* opposite of a writer/stay-home/mom of 4!

Kirsten
12 years ago

I work from home full time with a 2 year old (who goes to preschool twice a week for 4 hours) and I don’t have any advice because I feel like I’m still finding my balance with this whole thing and I’ve been doing it since I was pregnant – so there ya go. I need to back and read the comments and see if I can find some good advice for myself! haha – good luck to you girl, I know you can do this – you should be so proud of yourself!